Teacher Preparation: 25 May, De Morgan House, Russell Square

LMS Education Day 2017

Thursday 25th May, 11am – 3pm

De Morgan House, London

Teacher shortages in mathematics: how can HE mathematics departments help reverse the trend?

University mathematics departments depend on teachers to prepare their
own students, and they have an important role in training future generations of mathematics teachers. To do this effectively at a national level, it is critical that colleagues from across the sector understand the current state of Initial Teacher Training and the challenges that face teacher recruitment.

The day will be split into two parts. During the morning, participants will have the opportunity to learn about the challenges of teacher recruitment and find out how a number of maths departments have attempted to encourage students to think of mathematics teaching as a career. We are delighted that Simon Singh has agreed to introduce this session. After lunch, discussion, led by Tony Gardiner, will be focused around a document being developed by the LMS education committee on this subject for which input and feedback is sought. A detailed programme, including information about invited contributors, will follow in the coming weeks.

Whilst the theme for the day may seem somewhat removed from everyday teaching and learning activity within mathematics departments in HE, we do hope to get participants from a large number of mathematics departments to participate in the event and share their experiences and ideas.

The event is free to attend and a light lunch and other refreshments will be provided.

Please register interest in attending the event by emailing
Katherine.Wright@lms.ac.uk

Musings of a Mathematical Mom

[Reposted from Alexandra O Fradkin’s blog Musings of a Mathematical Mom; listed in reverse chronological order]

Skip counting or word skipping?

Numicon – combining geometry and arithmetic

Discussing the meaning of “almost” with an 8 year old

From math-hater to mathematician and computer scientist: The story of Allison Bishop

A number talk that turned into an investigation

Funville Adventures live on Kickstarter!

Logical Fun, Part II

Get ready for Funville Adventures!

Games with the multiplication table

Logical Fun, Part I

Arithmetic games – is that boring?

Playing with symmetry in kindergarten

The joys of peas and toothpicks for all ages!

Math enrichment – what is the value?

3-digit numbers are tricky! Part II

Entertaining kindergartners with caterpillars, dots, and monsters

3-digit numbers are tricky!

Games with tanks and mirror books

 Measuring everything in sight!

Functions in Kindergarten – A favorite

Avoid Hard Work! – A book for problem-solvers of all levels (toddler to mathematician)

Lots of fun with Tiny Polka Dot

Conservation of fingers and toes

Dots in a Square from Math Without Words

Double perfect squares

Four colors or more?

The Piaget Phenomenon

Time, symmetry, and unexpected turns

Why not count on our fingers?

Fibonacci Trees

Numbers on a Line

Ronnie Brown: from Esquisse d’un Programme by A Grothendieck

I just came across again the following (English translation):
 The demands of university teaching, addressed to students (including
those said to be “advanced”) with a modest (and frequently less than mod-
est) mathematical baggage, led me to a Draconian renewal of the themes
of reflection I proposed to my students, and gradually to myself as well.
It seemed important to me to start from an intuitive baggage common to
everyone,  independent of any technical language used to express it,  and
anterior to any such language
– it turned out that the geometric and topo-
logical intuition of shapes, particularly two-dimensional shapes, formed such
a common ground.
(my emphasis)
It seems to me a good idea, and expressed with AG’s usual mastery of language.
Ronnie