33rd MATHEMATICS TEACHERS AND ADVISERS CONFERENCE/WORKSHOP

33rd MATHEMATICS TEACHERS AND ADVISERS CONFERENCE/WORKSHOP
Friday 27th June 2014 13.00-17.00 – No registration fee

The 33rd Mathematics Teachers and Advisers Conference/Workshop provides an interface between the School of Mathematics at the University of Leeds and teachers in schools and sixth forms.

Teachers and university staff alike are given a rare opportunity to exchange valuable experiences and re-invigorate their perspectives on the ever-changing world of mathematics education.

Please book the date of 27th of June 2014 in your diary and attend the event.

If you have not done already so, in order to register, simply JUST SEND an EMAIL to:

D. Lesnic >>at<< leeds.ac.uk

and give your name, name of the school and email.

Programme:

Julian Gilbey (University of Cambridge) “Cambridge Mathematics
Education Project”

Currently in the development phase, the project will provide innovative online resources to help support and inspire teachers and students of A-levelĀ  mathematics. The aim is to help to make sixth-formĀ  mathematics a rich, coherent and stimulating experience for students and teachers. Join to get a preview of the web site, and to work together on some of the new A-level resources.

David Kaplan (Royal Statistical Society Centre for Statistical Education at Plymouth University) “SAS Curriculum Pathways”

Plymouth University has endorsed SAS Curriculum Pathways as a free-to-use online teaching and learning resource in order to promote the uptake of STEM subjects in further and higher education. The resource has been developed in the US over a number of years and has been successful for three main reasons:

(i) Commitment to Teachers. SAS Curriculum Pathways works in the classroom in large part because teachers have shaped every phase of the planning and production process.

(ii) Focus on Content. Teachers, developers, designers, and other specialists clarify content in the core disciplines. Content difficult to convey with conventional methods is tageted topics where doing and seeing provide information and encourage insights in ways that textbooks cannot.

(iii) Approach to Technology. SAS Curriculum Pathways makes learning more profound and efficient, not simply more engaging. Audio, visual, and interactive components all reinforce the learning objectives identified by teachers. It stands apart from other online resources becuase of its interactive nature students obtain immediate feedback. The resource promotes subject specific terminology and leads students through sometimes difficult methods in a structured way. http://www.sascurriculumpathways.com/portal

Sue Pope (Chair of the General Council of the Association of Teachers
of Mathematics) –“Post-16 Mathematics Opportunities and Challenges”

Despite increasing numbers of students studying level 3 Mathematics, England is remarkable in its low participation rates. The government is committed to increasing participation, yet will we have a curriculum and associated qualifications to do this? Will linear A levels, core maths, critical maths (MEI Gowers’-inspired) and other qualifications in development fit the bill? Have policy makers learnt from Curriculum 2000, or the Mathematics Pathways project? How do we ensure students have the mathematical skills to thrive whatever their future? And what are those skills?

Leave a Reply